World-Making After Empire: Spatial Reflections on the Postcolonial

Seminar Topical Questions in the History of Architecture (052-0852-22)
Organizer: Visiting Lectureship Kennedy
Lecturers: Dr. Hollyamber Kennedy
Time: Thursdays, 11.45 - 13.30
Location: HIL E 7
 

Livestream

What do we mean by the terms colonialism, imperialism, postcolonialism, decoloniality, and coloniality, and how do they intersect with and unsettle studies of territory, land, and landscape and of the built and spatially imagined environment? Using postcolonial thought as our lens, this course introduces students to the core ideas and key methodological strategies that inform critical spatial inquiries into the colonial past and its enduring present. Charting the development of a movement in thought that disavowed and sought to expose and understand the violence of colonialism, this course will explore recent narrative trends in architectural history that have taken seriously the imperatives of these discourses of freedom and independence and their analysis of the self-mythologizing power of the West. We will closely engage scholarship and place making that works to rethink and reclaim marginalized and ephemeral aesthetic histories and agencies.



This is a reading and discussion-based seminar. The aim is to introduce students to the core ideas and key methodological strategies that inform critical spatial inquiries into the colonial past and its enduring present. Students will be introduced to these concepts and methods through close readings of classic polemical texts that have shaped the arc of postcolonial thought and criticism, paying close attention to the political and intellectual contexts from which these texts emerged as examples of embodied and situated knowledge. Each week, these readings will be paired with a representative text of architectural history, as a window onto the decolonial movements taking shape within the field.

We will approach the subject of decolonial and postcolonial critique from an intersectional perspective, considering its close relation to the many currents of thought that it sits alongside, including critical studies of race and ethnicity, feminist and trans/queer criticism, anticolonial criticism, cultural studies, and minority and indigenous studies, all of which generated new entry points into the study of the colonial past and present. Thinking with Ania Loomba, we will ask how ongoing struggles, such as those of indigenous peoples and threatened lands, and the enclosure of the commons in different parts of the world, shed light on the long histories of colonialism.

Syllabus 
Recordings

Schedule



Moodle link

Contact


Dr. Holly Amber Kennedy
Carolina Contreras Alvarez